Aerial view of Accomplishment Creek and the Sagavanirktok River in the Brooks Range of Alaska.  Photo by D.L. Kane


What is Arctic Hydrology?
What is Arctic Hydrology?

This view of the Arctic hydrological cycle shows key linkages among land, ocean, and atmosphere. Quantifying the coupling of these components within the Arctic and to the larger Earth system remains an important yet unresolved research issue. The hydrological cycle is inextricably connected to all biological and chemical processes occurring in the biosphere, atmosphere, and cryosphere. Hydrologic interactions with terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and their biogeochemistry control all life in the pan-Arctic region.

Image Key:
A = atmospheric boundary fluxes;
B = atmospheric dynamics;
C = landsurface atmosphere exchanges with vegetation and permafrost dynamics;
D = discharge through well-defined flow networks with groundwater and river corridor flow;
E = water cycling and runoff over poorly-organized lowland flow systems;
F = sea ice mass balance and dynamics;
G = estuarine controls on terrestrial/shelf interactions;
H = changes in glacial mass balance and associated runoff;
I = direct groundwater discharge to ocean;
J = Arctic Ocean dynamics and deep water formation;
K = biological dynamics and oceanic food chains;
L = socioeconomic factors.







Arctic CHAMP
Science Management Office

Contact Information
Role of the Arctic-CHAMP Science Management Office
Photo: Aerial view of Accomplishment Creek and the
     Sagavanirktok River in the Brooks Range of Alaska.  Photo by D.L. Kane